Tag Archive | "Roman"

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This Valentine’s Day Have a Romantic Evening at McDonald’s

Posted on 09 February 2014 by Funny Picture Daily







“I’m lovin’ you.”


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Gold Digger Prank!

Posted on 27 October 2013 by Funny Picture Daily

Gold Digger Prank! So I went out to film how to pick up girls…but Roman,Dennis and I decided to do a little twist..the video speaks for it self check it icon smile Gold Digger Prank! Funny Picture Thanks To RomaAtWood And Dennis…

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Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit

Posted on 28 April 2012 by Funny Picture Daily

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europeanmoleanimal Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit Funny PictureWhen you stroll through a museum, you generally assume that all those ancient artifacts you’re seeing were dug up by professional archaeologists or found by accident by some farmer plowing his field. Mostly you’d be correct, but researchers into England’s Roman past are getting some unexpected help. . .from moles.

Moles at the site of Epiacum, a Roman fort dating from the first to the fourth centuries AD, have been getting busy digging holes in the soil and turning up all sorts of archaeological goodies. The site is protected by English Heritage and nobody, not even the local farmers, is allowed to dig on it. The moles have apparently never heard of English Heritage and have been tossing out Roman pottery, jewelry, and even a bit of old plumbing.

Volunteers have been sifting through the moles’ backdirt, under the watchful eye of English Heritage, and the artifacts are being sent to a nearby museum.

Epiacum, known locally as Whitley Castle, lies twelve miles to the south of Hadrian’s Wall and protected some nearby lead and silver mines. Click here for more information about visiting the site.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit originally appeared on Gadling on Thu, 26 Apr 2012 15:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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 Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit Funny Picture

 Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit Funny Picture

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 Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit Funny Picture
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[Video] Roman Candle to the Head

Posted on 21 March 2012 by Funny Picture Daily

roamn [Video] Roman Candle to the Head Funny Picture Added: 2012-03-19 04:07:26
Boom! Headshot!

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Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show

Posted on 01 December 2011 by Funny Picture Daily

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leptismagna9 Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show Funny Picture
The recent fighting in Libya that toppled Gaddafi destroyed many lives and laid waste to many neighborhoods. Now that the country is beginning to rebuild, Libyans are taking stock of other effects of the war.

Libya’s beautiful Roman remains, it appears, got off easy. Earlier this week, the Guardian reported that the Roman cities of Lepcis Magna and Sabratha both survived the war without any significant damage. This news came from Dr. Hafed Walda, a Libyan scholar working at King’s College, London. Dr. Walda has excavated and studied Lepcis Magna for more than 15 years.

On the other hand, the new government displayed a cache of Roman artifacts that it says were going to be sold on the international antiquities market to finance Gaddafi’s fight to stay in power. They were found on the day Tripoli fell to the rebels in the trunk of a car driven by Gaddafi loyalists as they tried to escape. No word on what happened to the pro-Gaddafi fighters. One can imagine.

This brings up the question of how many more artifacts were stolen from museums and archaeological sites, and if any made it abroad into the hands of unscrupulous collectors. Iraq and Afghanistan lost a huge amount of their heritage this way. Much of it disappeared after the main fighting, when armed bands looted what they could before a new regime was installed.

Continue reading Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show

Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show originally appeared on Gadling on Thu, 01 Dec 2011 09:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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 Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show Funny Picture

 Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show Funny Picture

 Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show Funny Picture  Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show Funny Picture

 Roman sites in Libya survived the war mostly unscathed, initial reports show Funny Picture
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Roman Polanski’s House

Posted on 06 November 2011 by Funny Picture Daily

ecc2f65b 439d 4212 995c cfc04950aec0 thumb Roman Polanskis House Funny Picture Hey, baby. I'm not going to touch you because I don't want to go to jail.

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New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empire’s northernmost border

Posted on 22 September 2011 by Funny Picture Daily

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antoninewall New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny PictureThere’s not much left of it now, just a deep swale in the earth and a few stones jutting out of the grass. Almost two thousand years ago, though, it was the northernmost boundary of the Roman Empire.

The Antonine Wall protected a narrow part of Scotland between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde, from the 140s to 160s AD. After the Emperor Hadrian built Hadrian’s Wall across what is now the border of England and Scotland, his successor Antoninus Pius decided to move 100 miles further north to gain a military and propaganda victory and add more land to the empire. The wall was built of turf on a stone foundation and stretched 39 miles, as opposed to the stone Hadrian’s Wall that ran 73 miles. Forts placed at regular intervals strengthened the both walls.

Now a new permanent exhibit at the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow brings together numerous artifacts from the wall to show what life was like for the soldiers living up there. Included are several elaborate sculptures commissions by Antoninus Pius to show off his great victory.

The Antonine Wall was only used from 142 to 162, and briefly again around 208. Later emperors decided it wasn’t worth the expense and effort and instead used Hadrian’s Wall as the northernmost boundary. Despite this short lifespan, several communities sprang up around it and there were at least two Roman baths. Excavations have yielded some interesting artifacts such as preserved sandals and a gravestone that shows someone from the Middle East lived there.

I’ve walked the length of Hadrian’s Wall along the Hadrian’s Wall Path and would love to do the same with the Antonine Wall, but sadly there is not yet a trail going along this important remnant of the glory of Rome.

antoninusaureus New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny Picture

[Wall photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons. Photo of coin of Antoninus Pius also courtesy Wikimedia Commons]

New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empire’s northernmost border originally appeared on Gadling on Thu, 22 Sep 2011 11:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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 New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny Picture

 New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny Picture

 New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny Picture  New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny Picture

 New exhibit sheds light on Antonine Wall, the Roman Empires northernmost border Funny Picture
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Roman shipwreck found off Albanian coast

Posted on 19 August 2011 by Funny Picture Daily

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An underwater archaeological survey has turned up a Roman shipwreck off the coast of Albania.

As the above video shows, the remains of the ship are now little more than a heap of amphorae, the characteristic pots the Romans used to transport wine. The team hasn’t had a chance to excavate the site yet, so more finds may lie hidden beneath the bottom of the sea.

The archaeologists estimate that the ship was from the first or second century BC and was part of an extensive wine trade on the Adriatic Sea. The ship was about 30 meters long and contained an estimated 300 or more amphorae. The excavation was funded by the RPM Nautical Foundation, which has discovered numerous shipwrecks in recent years.

Shipwrecks can tell us a lot about early technology and trade. Several museums are dedicated to them. In Stockholm, Sweden, the Vasa Museum houses the well-preserved remains of a warship that sank in 1628. Despite its impressive appearance, it was badly designed and sank less than a nautical mile into its maiden voyage. In Portsmouth, England, the Mary Rose Museum has a warship that sank in battle in 1545. The Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, Denmark, houses five Viking ships dating to about 1070.

Roman shipwreck found off Albanian coast originally appeared on Gadling on Fri, 19 Aug 2011 14:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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 Roman shipwreck found off Albanian coast Funny Picture

 Roman shipwreck found off Albanian coast Funny Picture

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 Roman shipwreck found off Albanian coast Funny Picture
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